Blog Posts in June, 2010

  • What Is Going On At Oregon State Hospital?

    || 18-Jun-2010

    Last year a mentally ill patient in a medium-security ward at Oregon State Hospital lay dead in his hospital bed for several hours before anyone noticed. As a result, the U.S. Department of Justice sent a warning letter to the state indicating Oregon better shape up or risk getting sued by the DOJ. In addition, the State Office of Investigations and Training found the hospital was negligent in its ...
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  • Avoid Hospitals In July?

    || 16-Jun-2010

    A physician friend of mine once told me to avoid teaching hospitals in July. Why? Because that’s when teaching hospitals get a whole new roster of newbie medical residents. Now, I’m all about education and training, but do I want to be the guinea pig for these fresh-from-the-classroom residents? According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, this phenomenon is known as the ...
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  • Hey, J&J, Can't We All Just Get Along?

    || 11-Jun-2010

    We blogged a while back about the Food and Drug Administration investigating the safety of a number of over-the-counter pediatric medicines, namely Children’s Tylenol, Motrin, Benadryl, and Zyrtec. The drugs are manufactured by McNeil Consumer Healthcare, a division of Johnson & Johnson. The company issued a voluntary recall of some 43 over-the-counter children’s medicines. ...
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  • Trimet Bus Safety Review Continues

    || 9-Jun-2010

    Since the April accident in which a TriMet bus driver struck and killed two and injured three, the transit agency has undergone a safety review. Conducted by K&J Safety and Security Consulting Services, an initial report was recently issued. The report pinpoints some areas for improvement, though it does commend TriMet for having better than average safety programs. The report recommends ...
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  • Hospital Infections No Longer a Secret

    || 4-Jun-2010

    Oregonians who wish to investigate hospital infection rates can now do so, as the state is one of ten that now requires hospitals to publicly report them. Infections due to hospital exposure have risen across the nation, and Oregon officials are hoping that publicizing the rates will encourage hospitals to take measures to decrease the rate of infections and to educate patients. The rates provide ...
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